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The Resource Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884., (electronic resource)

Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884., (electronic resource)

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Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884.
Title
Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884.
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Subject
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Language
eng
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Readex
Government publication
federal national government publication
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
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dictionaries
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/organizationName
United States
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
United States
Series statement
  • United States congressional serial set;
  • Mis. doc. / 48th Congress, 2nd session. House
Series volume
  • serial set no. 2310
  • no. 6
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Albatross (Ship)
  • Aquaculture
  • Aquariums
  • Carp
  • Corals
  • Crustaceans
  • Eels
  • Fish as food
  • Fish hatcheries
  • Fisheries and fishing industry
  • Fishery regulation and management
  • Fishes
  • Herring
  • Industrial accidents and safety
  • Lobsters
  • Mackerel
  • Marine biology
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Shad
  • Shellfish
  • Steam-engines
  • Trout
  • Turtles
  • Forms, blanks, etc
  • Research
Label
Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884., (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Topical synopsis of the articles and notes, p. X
  • List of illustrations, p. XII
  • 1. Inspection of fish and other marine products in the District of Columbia, 1879 to 1883, inclusive, p 1
  • 2. Report upon the shad and herring fisheries of the Potomac River for 1883, p 13
  • 3. Occurrence of Balistes vetula on the New Jersey coast, p 13
  • 4. Carp in England in the seventeenth century, p 14
  • 5. Movements of mackerel in winter, p 15
  • 6. A large squid, p 15
  • 7. The transplanting of one hundred lobsters from the eastern part of Long Island to Chesapeake Bay, p 16
  • 8. A four-pound carp lives eight hours out of water by being packed in wet moss, p 16
  • 9. On a new form of filter or diaphragm to be used in the culture of oysters in ponds, p 17
  • 10. Notes on the acclimatization of fish in Victoria, Australia, p 31
  • 11. The selection of sites and the construction of carp ponds, p 33
  • 12. On a skin parasite of the cunner (Ctenolabrus adspersus), p 37
  • 13. Journal of operations on the grounds of the Eastern Shore Oyster Company, on Chincoteague Bay, near Stockton, Md., during the summer of 1883, p 43
  • 14. Notes on the menhaden fishing of 1883, p 47
  • 15. Method of catching crabs, p 48
  • 16. A search for mackerel off Block Island, Montauk, and Sandy Hook, in November 1883, p 49
  • 17. Depletion of fish in Panguitch and Bear Lakes, Utah, p 51
  • 18. Note on the use of the male salmon hook, and the run of 1883, p 52
  • 19. American lake trout and whitefish in France, p 52
  • 20. The fisheries of New Zealand, p 53
  • 21. A marine monster, p 55
  • 22. Return to Gloucester Harbor of the young codfish hatched by the U.S. Fish Commission, p 57
  • 23. Some observations on the cod gill-net fisheries and on preservatives for nets, p 58
  • 24. Notes on the Scotch herring fisheries, p 60
  • 25. American fish introduced in English waters, p 60
  • 26. Habits of the shad and herring, as the appear in the Potomac River to one who has watched them for fifty years, p 61
  • 27. Efforts in trout culture, p 64
  • 28. Notes on the Scotch fisheries, p 64
  • 29. What fish culture has first to accomplish, p 65
  • 30. Pisciculture in England, p 69
  • 31. Composition of some of the food-fishes, p 74
  • 32. A great carp, p 75
  • 33. American land-locked salmon and lake trout in France, p 76
  • 34. Number of eggs in the Gadidae, p 76
  • 35. The fishes of Florida keys, p 77
  • 36. Food qualities of Tarpum (Megalops), p 80
  • 37. Occurrence of mullet in fresh water, p 80
  • 38. Inauguration of the frozen-herring trade, p 81
  • 39. Minute upon the death of Oren M. Chase, George W. Armstrong, and Charles H. Brownell, p 83
  • 40. Poachers or destructive visitors of fish ponds, p 85
  • 41. Success in raising landlocked salmon, p 87
  • 42. Planting Irish shells -- Helix aspersa Mueller -- at Wood's Holl, Mass., p 87
  • 43. A Chinese method of fish-culture, p 88
  • 44. Shad in Oregon waters -- a new salmon hatchery, p 88
  • 45. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 89
  • 46. Report on the condition of oyster culture in France in 1881, p 97
  • 47. A note on the Cuban eel, p 111
  • 48. Whitefish, lake-trout, and brook-trout in France, p 112
  • 49. Carp in an installment of shad from James River, p 112
  • 50. Instructions for taking whitefish eggs, p 113
  • 51. Exchange of land-locked salmon eggs from Maine for Loch Leven trout ova from Scotland, p 114
  • 52. Success of fish-culture, p 115
  • 53. Notes on cod, shrimp, etc., at Cold Spring Harbor, p 123
  • 54. Carp caught in Ogeechee River, p 123
  • 55. Carp appear February 7, take the hook, and are excellent eating, p 124
  • 56. Comision de piscicultura de la Republica Mexicana, p 124
  • 57. Notes on fishing products exported from San Francisco, Cal., during the year 1883, p 125
  • 58. In regard to the "sea-serpent" of literature, p 128
  • 59. Notes on the cod gill-net fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., 1883-'84, p 129
  • 60. Statement of the catch of the several companies engaged in the salmon fisheries in Kadiak District, Alaska Territory, during the year 1883, p 134
  • 61. Some notes on the mullet fisheries, p 135
  • 62. Acclimatization of Salmo quinnat in France, p 138
  • 63. Depredations to oyster beds by star-fish, p 138
  • 64. How to cook carp and tench, p 139
  • 65. Report of an examination of the shad fisheries in Georgetown, S.C., p 140
  • 66. Proposed introduction of Hawaiian mullet into the United States, p 141
  • 67. The incipiency of night-seining for mackerel, p 142
  • 68. Waterproofing for herring-nets, p 143
  • 69. Transfer of soft-shell terrapin from the Ohio to the Potomac River, p 143
  • 70. Acclimatization of Salmo quinnat in France, p 144
  • 71. Notes of a trip in the Gulf of Mexico, p 144
  • 72. Report on the working of the boilers and engine of the United States Fish Commission steamer Albatross, p 145
  • 73. How to cook carp, p 151
  • 74. Carp do eat young fishes, p 152
  • 75. Annual report on the electric lighting of the United States steamer Albatross, December 31, 1883, p 153
  • 76. Plants for carp ponds, p 159
  • 77. Report on the shad work in South Carolina in 1883 -- transportation of shad-eggs on trays, p 161
  • 78. Report on California trout distribution in South Carolina in 1883, p 164
  • 79. Shad-fishing on the Edisto River, p 165
  • 80. Culture of edible snails, p 166
  • 81. American black bass placed in the river Nene, England, p 166
  • 82. The "Kurren" and "Keitel" (fishing vessels) of the Courland Haff, p 167
  • 83. Wooden tank for the transportation of living fish, p 168
  • 84. Penning of salmon in order to secure their eggs, p 169
  • 85. Memoranda relative to inclosures for the confinement of salmon, drawn from experience at Bucksport, Penobscot River, Maine, p 170
  • 86. Further report of R.D. Hume's salmon hatchery, Oregon, p 174
  • 87. What codfish sometimes swallow, p 175
  • 88. Leech culture, p 175
  • 89. Edible qualities of carp, p 176
  • 90. On the specimens received by the Smithsonian Institution from the United States Life Saving Service, p 177
  • 91. Weights of salmon taken at McCloud River station in 1880, p 178
  • 92. Vitality of German carp and restoration of some apparently dead, p 179
  • 93. Loss of life and property in the Gloucester fisheries, p 180
  • 94. Loss of life and property in the fisheries, p 181
  • 95. Resuscitation of apparently dead carp, p 183
  • 96. Remarkable resuscitation of frozen carp, p 183
  • 97. Destruction of small fish in weirs, p 184
  • 98. Concerning the salmon fisheries of Bretagne, France, and the need of fish-ways and restrictive legislation, p 185
  • 99. An act to prohibit fishing by steam vessels with shirred or purse seines in any of the waters within the jurisdiction of the State of New Jersey, p 187
  • 100. Brief of the objections made before Leon Abbott, Governor of New Jersey, to the "Act to prohibit fishing by steam vessels with shirred or purse seines in any of the waters within the jurisdiction of the State of New Jersey," p 189
  • 101. Report upon the receipt and hatching of American whitefish ova and planting of the fry in Australia, p 190
  • 102. Notes on the cod gill-net fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., 1883-'84, p 191
  • 103. On the natural and artificial fertilization of sea herring eggs, p 193
  • 104. Shad eggs sent to Cold Spring Harbor, New York, to be hatched, p 198
  • 105. Report of a trip made by the Fish Hawk to the lower part of Chesapeake Bay, to ascertain the character of the fisheries for shad, herring, etc., in the spring of 1884, p 199
  • 106. The influence of artificial propagation upon production illustrated by the salmon work of the Sacramento River, California, p 201
  • 107. Tables illustrative of the nutritive value of fish, p 203
  • 108. How to avoid a soft or muddy taste of carp, p 205
  • 109. Reconnaissance of Florida rivers, with a view to shad hatching, p 206
  • 110. Note on the breeding of eels, p 208
  • 111. Anton Pintsch's movable fish-way, p 209
  • 112. Transferring catfish from the Potomac to the Colorado River, Arizona, p 212
  • 113. An adventure with a whale in the River Tay, Scotland, p 213
  • 114. Cultivating trout in Oregon, p 217
  • 115. Notes on the Great Lake fisheries, depletion of black bass, etc., p 218
  • 116. Spawning in Germany of the large-mouthed black bass sent from the United States in 1882, p 219
  • 117. Transportation of clams and oysters, p 219
  • 118. Catching fish in a creek in Tennessee by a water-snake, p 220
  • 119. Report upon the shad and herring fisheries of the Potomac River for 1884, p 221
  • 120. A new method of protecting the eggs of carp and rearing the young, p 221
  • 121. Need of a national law to regulate the size of mesh of both pound and gill nets on the Great Lakes, p 223
  • 122. Report upon the propagation of striped bass at Weldon, N.C., in the spring of 1884, p 225
  • 123. The carp ponds belonging to the State of Texas, p 230
  • 124. Opening the Broad and other rivers of North Carolina to shad, bass, etc., p 232
  • 125. Memorandum of the present condition and future needs of the oyster industry, p 233
  • 126. Report respecting the present condition and future prospects at Saint Jerome Creek for the work of oyster culture, p 235
  • 127. On the occurrence of corals on the Grand Banks, p 237
  • 128. Report of analysis of a sample of fish guano made from salmon offal, by Mr. Joseph Spratt, of Victoria, British Columbia, p 238
  • 129. Snakes catching fish, p 239
  • 130. Occurrence of black grouper or jew-fish off Block Island, p 240
  • 131. Report of a trip by the steamer Fish Hawk to the St. Mary's and St. John's Rivers to hatch shad, p 241
  • 132. Reconnaissance of the shad fisheries of Winyaw Bay and its tributaries by the steamer Fish Hawk, p 242
  • 133. Extracts from a report of investigations of the shad fisheries and rivers south of Charleston, S.C., with a view to establishing stations for artificial propagation, p 244
  • 134. Note on the destruction of mackerel by dogfish, p 248
  • 135. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 249
  • 136. Catching alewives with hooks baited with eels, p 255
  • 137. On the cultivation of soft-shell crabs, p 256
  • 138. A fish-eating plant, p 257
  • 139. A carnivorous plant preying on vertetbrata [sic], p 259
  • 140. The fish eating Utricularia, or bladderwort, p 261
  • 141. Memorandum of some results of fish culture already attained, p 261
  • 142. Notes on the bluefish, mortality of Florida fishes, etc., p 263
  • 143. Character of the carp introduced by Capt. Henry Robinson about 1830, p 266
  • 144. Several opinions upon how to catch carp, p 268
  • 145. Notes on the cultivation of fish -- mostly American -- in France, p 273
  • 146. Notes on the history of the fish-hook, p 282
  • 147. California trout planted in Roanoke River in July 1883, retaken in June 1884, p 286
  • 148. The fish of Lake Champlain, p 287
  • 149. A landlocked salmon caught in Erie Canal, p 288
  • 150. On the position and character of the fishing grounds of the Gulf of Mexico, p 289
  • 151. A California salmon taken in James River, p 290
  • 152. Thanks of the executive committee of the London International Fisheries Exhibition for the participation by the United States, p 291
  • 153. Proposed propagation of catfish as a food-fish, p 292
  • 154. Brook trout from Monadnock Lake and Cristine Lake, New Hampshire, p 293
  • 155. Snakes destructive to carp, p 294
  • 156. What muskrats sometimes eat, p 295
  • 157. The destruction of carp by the musk-rat (Fiber zibethicus) -- methods of trapping the rodent, p 296
  • 158. The musk-rat as a fish eater, p 297
  • 159. Notes on a disease affecting crawfish in Germany, p 299
  • 160. Floats for the so-called fattening of oysters, p 302
  • 161. The Columbia River salmon -- a hatchery needed, p 304
  • 162. Brief notes upon fish and the fisheries, p 305
  • 163. The speckled catfish, p 321
  • 164. The migrations of the salmon (Salmo salar L.) in the Baltic, p 322
  • 165. Great results obtained with little water, p 329
  • 166. Some of the difficulties which confront oyster breeders, p 332
  • 167. Can herring live and increase in inclosed waters, p 333
  • 168. Fish in the National Park and tributaries of Snake River -- propagation of whitefish, p 335
  • 169. Notes on the shad season of 1884, with references to other species, p 337
  • 170. Memoranda on landlocked salmon, p 341
  • 171. Note on the regeneration of the scales of the German carp, p 345
  • 172. The sturgeon fishery, p 346
  • 173. The cultivation of the sea, p 348
  • 174. The fish of Devil's Lake, Dakota, p 351
  • 175. Notes on the fish and fisheries of Japan, p 352
  • 176. Destruction of fish caused by nets of small mesh in Lake Michigan, p 353
  • 177. Notes upon oyster experiments in 1883, p 354
  • 178. The oyster as a popular article of food in North America, p 356
  • 179. Brief notes upon fish and fisheries, p 359
  • 180. Effect of cold on fishes, p 369
  • 181. The Scotch cod and ling fisheries, p 371
  • 182. On apparatus for collecting oyster spat, p 373
  • 183. Trapping kingfishers, rodents, and other enemies of trout, p 375
  • 184. Experiments in penning sea-fish, p 377
  • 185. Method of catching carp with a hook, p 380
  • 186. Care of goldfish -- Queries of William Rosenstihl, Jr., with replies, p 381
  • 187. Exports of fish-oil from Norway, 1878-'82, p 382
  • 188. Ten questions concerning the habits and breeding of landlocked salmon, with replies, p 383
  • 189. Report on black bass sent from America to Germany in 1883, p 384
  • 190. Arrangement with the Life-Saving Service and the Light-House Board for collecting whales, porpoises, sharks, and strange forms of marine life, p 385
  • 191. Use of light in sea-fishing, p 387
  • 192. The mode of life of eels, p 389
  • 193. The weight of fish in different conditions, p 391
  • 194. The world's market for klip-fish, roe, and herring, p 392
  • 195. On the conditions under which trout exist in the German waters, p 393
  • 196. Martin Brandt's method of preserving fresh fish and other articles of food, p 395
  • 197. A list of the blank forms, circulars, and minor publications of the United States Fish Commission, from August 1, 1883, to August 1, 1884, p 397
  • 198. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 401
  • 199. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 410
  • 200. Sanitary report on Old Providence Island, United States of Colombia, p 412
  • 201. Treatment of the Casella-Miller thermometer, p 415
  • 202. Hatching blackfish and Spanish mackerel, p 415
  • 203. The sea-fisheries of France and Algiers, p 417
  • 204. Discussion at the Dresden Conference in 1883, of the kinds of fish eggs to be obtained from the United States, p 419
  • 205. Notes on the decrease of lobsters, p 421
  • 206. Rearing carp in alkaline water, p 426
  • 207. On the scarcity of mackerel in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, p 427
  • 208. Notes on the Scotch herring fisheries, p 431
  • 209. Porpoise-fishing at Cape May, New Jersey, p 431
  • 210. Note upon the effect of high pressures on the vitality of minute fresh-water and salt-water organisms, p 433
  • 211. On the scarcity of mackerel in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, p 435
  • 212. Two hundred tons of dead fish, mostly perch, at Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, p 439
  • 213. Destruction of fish-food by bladderwort (Utricularia), p 443
  • 214. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 444
  • 215. Trapping gaspereau in Tangipahoa River, p 448
  • 216. On manufactured food for trout and carp, p 449
  • 217. On manufactured food for trout and carp, p 453
  • 218. Brief notes upon fish and fisheries, p 456
  • 219. The Canadian fisheries, p 457
  • 220. On the abundance of halibut near Iceland, p 463
  • 221. Artificial sea water for aquaria, p 465
  • 222. The oyster industry of the world, p 468
  • 223. Brief notes upon fish and the fisheries, p 469
  • Index, p. 471
Color
multicolored
Control code
NB00000066076
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unknown
Extent
500 p.
Form of item
electronic
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institutions
Other physical details
illustrations, tables
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
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remote
System control number
(Readex)10E60465612F54B0
Terms governing use
©2007 by NewsBank, Inc. All rights reserved
Label
Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission. Vol. IV, for 1884., (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
  • Topical synopsis of the articles and notes, p. X
  • List of illustrations, p. XII
  • 1. Inspection of fish and other marine products in the District of Columbia, 1879 to 1883, inclusive, p 1
  • 2. Report upon the shad and herring fisheries of the Potomac River for 1883, p 13
  • 3. Occurrence of Balistes vetula on the New Jersey coast, p 13
  • 4. Carp in England in the seventeenth century, p 14
  • 5. Movements of mackerel in winter, p 15
  • 6. A large squid, p 15
  • 7. The transplanting of one hundred lobsters from the eastern part of Long Island to Chesapeake Bay, p 16
  • 8. A four-pound carp lives eight hours out of water by being packed in wet moss, p 16
  • 9. On a new form of filter or diaphragm to be used in the culture of oysters in ponds, p 17
  • 10. Notes on the acclimatization of fish in Victoria, Australia, p 31
  • 11. The selection of sites and the construction of carp ponds, p 33
  • 12. On a skin parasite of the cunner (Ctenolabrus adspersus), p 37
  • 13. Journal of operations on the grounds of the Eastern Shore Oyster Company, on Chincoteague Bay, near Stockton, Md., during the summer of 1883, p 43
  • 14. Notes on the menhaden fishing of 1883, p 47
  • 15. Method of catching crabs, p 48
  • 16. A search for mackerel off Block Island, Montauk, and Sandy Hook, in November 1883, p 49
  • 17. Depletion of fish in Panguitch and Bear Lakes, Utah, p 51
  • 18. Note on the use of the male salmon hook, and the run of 1883, p 52
  • 19. American lake trout and whitefish in France, p 52
  • 20. The fisheries of New Zealand, p 53
  • 21. A marine monster, p 55
  • 22. Return to Gloucester Harbor of the young codfish hatched by the U.S. Fish Commission, p 57
  • 23. Some observations on the cod gill-net fisheries and on preservatives for nets, p 58
  • 24. Notes on the Scotch herring fisheries, p 60
  • 25. American fish introduced in English waters, p 60
  • 26. Habits of the shad and herring, as the appear in the Potomac River to one who has watched them for fifty years, p 61
  • 27. Efforts in trout culture, p 64
  • 28. Notes on the Scotch fisheries, p 64
  • 29. What fish culture has first to accomplish, p 65
  • 30. Pisciculture in England, p 69
  • 31. Composition of some of the food-fishes, p 74
  • 32. A great carp, p 75
  • 33. American land-locked salmon and lake trout in France, p 76
  • 34. Number of eggs in the Gadidae, p 76
  • 35. The fishes of Florida keys, p 77
  • 36. Food qualities of Tarpum (Megalops), p 80
  • 37. Occurrence of mullet in fresh water, p 80
  • 38. Inauguration of the frozen-herring trade, p 81
  • 39. Minute upon the death of Oren M. Chase, George W. Armstrong, and Charles H. Brownell, p 83
  • 40. Poachers or destructive visitors of fish ponds, p 85
  • 41. Success in raising landlocked salmon, p 87
  • 42. Planting Irish shells -- Helix aspersa Mueller -- at Wood's Holl, Mass., p 87
  • 43. A Chinese method of fish-culture, p 88
  • 44. Shad in Oregon waters -- a new salmon hatchery, p 88
  • 45. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 89
  • 46. Report on the condition of oyster culture in France in 1881, p 97
  • 47. A note on the Cuban eel, p 111
  • 48. Whitefish, lake-trout, and brook-trout in France, p 112
  • 49. Carp in an installment of shad from James River, p 112
  • 50. Instructions for taking whitefish eggs, p 113
  • 51. Exchange of land-locked salmon eggs from Maine for Loch Leven trout ova from Scotland, p 114
  • 52. Success of fish-culture, p 115
  • 53. Notes on cod, shrimp, etc., at Cold Spring Harbor, p 123
  • 54. Carp caught in Ogeechee River, p 123
  • 55. Carp appear February 7, take the hook, and are excellent eating, p 124
  • 56. Comision de piscicultura de la Republica Mexicana, p 124
  • 57. Notes on fishing products exported from San Francisco, Cal., during the year 1883, p 125
  • 58. In regard to the "sea-serpent" of literature, p 128
  • 59. Notes on the cod gill-net fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., 1883-'84, p 129
  • 60. Statement of the catch of the several companies engaged in the salmon fisheries in Kadiak District, Alaska Territory, during the year 1883, p 134
  • 61. Some notes on the mullet fisheries, p 135
  • 62. Acclimatization of Salmo quinnat in France, p 138
  • 63. Depredations to oyster beds by star-fish, p 138
  • 64. How to cook carp and tench, p 139
  • 65. Report of an examination of the shad fisheries in Georgetown, S.C., p 140
  • 66. Proposed introduction of Hawaiian mullet into the United States, p 141
  • 67. The incipiency of night-seining for mackerel, p 142
  • 68. Waterproofing for herring-nets, p 143
  • 69. Transfer of soft-shell terrapin from the Ohio to the Potomac River, p 143
  • 70. Acclimatization of Salmo quinnat in France, p 144
  • 71. Notes of a trip in the Gulf of Mexico, p 144
  • 72. Report on the working of the boilers and engine of the United States Fish Commission steamer Albatross, p 145
  • 73. How to cook carp, p 151
  • 74. Carp do eat young fishes, p 152
  • 75. Annual report on the electric lighting of the United States steamer Albatross, December 31, 1883, p 153
  • 76. Plants for carp ponds, p 159
  • 77. Report on the shad work in South Carolina in 1883 -- transportation of shad-eggs on trays, p 161
  • 78. Report on California trout distribution in South Carolina in 1883, p 164
  • 79. Shad-fishing on the Edisto River, p 165
  • 80. Culture of edible snails, p 166
  • 81. American black bass placed in the river Nene, England, p 166
  • 82. The "Kurren" and "Keitel" (fishing vessels) of the Courland Haff, p 167
  • 83. Wooden tank for the transportation of living fish, p 168
  • 84. Penning of salmon in order to secure their eggs, p 169
  • 85. Memoranda relative to inclosures for the confinement of salmon, drawn from experience at Bucksport, Penobscot River, Maine, p 170
  • 86. Further report of R.D. Hume's salmon hatchery, Oregon, p 174
  • 87. What codfish sometimes swallow, p 175
  • 88. Leech culture, p 175
  • 89. Edible qualities of carp, p 176
  • 90. On the specimens received by the Smithsonian Institution from the United States Life Saving Service, p 177
  • 91. Weights of salmon taken at McCloud River station in 1880, p 178
  • 92. Vitality of German carp and restoration of some apparently dead, p 179
  • 93. Loss of life and property in the Gloucester fisheries, p 180
  • 94. Loss of life and property in the fisheries, p 181
  • 95. Resuscitation of apparently dead carp, p 183
  • 96. Remarkable resuscitation of frozen carp, p 183
  • 97. Destruction of small fish in weirs, p 184
  • 98. Concerning the salmon fisheries of Bretagne, France, and the need of fish-ways and restrictive legislation, p 185
  • 99. An act to prohibit fishing by steam vessels with shirred or purse seines in any of the waters within the jurisdiction of the State of New Jersey, p 187
  • 100. Brief of the objections made before Leon Abbott, Governor of New Jersey, to the "Act to prohibit fishing by steam vessels with shirred or purse seines in any of the waters within the jurisdiction of the State of New Jersey," p 189
  • 101. Report upon the receipt and hatching of American whitefish ova and planting of the fry in Australia, p 190
  • 102. Notes on the cod gill-net fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., 1883-'84, p 191
  • 103. On the natural and artificial fertilization of sea herring eggs, p 193
  • 104. Shad eggs sent to Cold Spring Harbor, New York, to be hatched, p 198
  • 105. Report of a trip made by the Fish Hawk to the lower part of Chesapeake Bay, to ascertain the character of the fisheries for shad, herring, etc., in the spring of 1884, p 199
  • 106. The influence of artificial propagation upon production illustrated by the salmon work of the Sacramento River, California, p 201
  • 107. Tables illustrative of the nutritive value of fish, p 203
  • 108. How to avoid a soft or muddy taste of carp, p 205
  • 109. Reconnaissance of Florida rivers, with a view to shad hatching, p 206
  • 110. Note on the breeding of eels, p 208
  • 111. Anton Pintsch's movable fish-way, p 209
  • 112. Transferring catfish from the Potomac to the Colorado River, Arizona, p 212
  • 113. An adventure with a whale in the River Tay, Scotland, p 213
  • 114. Cultivating trout in Oregon, p 217
  • 115. Notes on the Great Lake fisheries, depletion of black bass, etc., p 218
  • 116. Spawning in Germany of the large-mouthed black bass sent from the United States in 1882, p 219
  • 117. Transportation of clams and oysters, p 219
  • 118. Catching fish in a creek in Tennessee by a water-snake, p 220
  • 119. Report upon the shad and herring fisheries of the Potomac River for 1884, p 221
  • 120. A new method of protecting the eggs of carp and rearing the young, p 221
  • 121. Need of a national law to regulate the size of mesh of both pound and gill nets on the Great Lakes, p 223
  • 122. Report upon the propagation of striped bass at Weldon, N.C., in the spring of 1884, p 225
  • 123. The carp ponds belonging to the State of Texas, p 230
  • 124. Opening the Broad and other rivers of North Carolina to shad, bass, etc., p 232
  • 125. Memorandum of the present condition and future needs of the oyster industry, p 233
  • 126. Report respecting the present condition and future prospects at Saint Jerome Creek for the work of oyster culture, p 235
  • 127. On the occurrence of corals on the Grand Banks, p 237
  • 128. Report of analysis of a sample of fish guano made from salmon offal, by Mr. Joseph Spratt, of Victoria, British Columbia, p 238
  • 129. Snakes catching fish, p 239
  • 130. Occurrence of black grouper or jew-fish off Block Island, p 240
  • 131. Report of a trip by the steamer Fish Hawk to the St. Mary's and St. John's Rivers to hatch shad, p 241
  • 132. Reconnaissance of the shad fisheries of Winyaw Bay and its tributaries by the steamer Fish Hawk, p 242
  • 133. Extracts from a report of investigations of the shad fisheries and rivers south of Charleston, S.C., with a view to establishing stations for artificial propagation, p 244
  • 134. Note on the destruction of mackerel by dogfish, p 248
  • 135. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 249
  • 136. Catching alewives with hooks baited with eels, p 255
  • 137. On the cultivation of soft-shell crabs, p 256
  • 138. A fish-eating plant, p 257
  • 139. A carnivorous plant preying on vertetbrata [sic], p 259
  • 140. The fish eating Utricularia, or bladderwort, p 261
  • 141. Memorandum of some results of fish culture already attained, p 261
  • 142. Notes on the bluefish, mortality of Florida fishes, etc., p 263
  • 143. Character of the carp introduced by Capt. Henry Robinson about 1830, p 266
  • 144. Several opinions upon how to catch carp, p 268
  • 145. Notes on the cultivation of fish -- mostly American -- in France, p 273
  • 146. Notes on the history of the fish-hook, p 282
  • 147. California trout planted in Roanoke River in July 1883, retaken in June 1884, p 286
  • 148. The fish of Lake Champlain, p 287
  • 149. A landlocked salmon caught in Erie Canal, p 288
  • 150. On the position and character of the fishing grounds of the Gulf of Mexico, p 289
  • 151. A California salmon taken in James River, p 290
  • 152. Thanks of the executive committee of the London International Fisheries Exhibition for the participation by the United States, p 291
  • 153. Proposed propagation of catfish as a food-fish, p 292
  • 154. Brook trout from Monadnock Lake and Cristine Lake, New Hampshire, p 293
  • 155. Snakes destructive to carp, p 294
  • 156. What muskrats sometimes eat, p 295
  • 157. The destruction of carp by the musk-rat (Fiber zibethicus) -- methods of trapping the rodent, p 296
  • 158. The musk-rat as a fish eater, p 297
  • 159. Notes on a disease affecting crawfish in Germany, p 299
  • 160. Floats for the so-called fattening of oysters, p 302
  • 161. The Columbia River salmon -- a hatchery needed, p 304
  • 162. Brief notes upon fish and the fisheries, p 305
  • 163. The speckled catfish, p 321
  • 164. The migrations of the salmon (Salmo salar L.) in the Baltic, p 322
  • 165. Great results obtained with little water, p 329
  • 166. Some of the difficulties which confront oyster breeders, p 332
  • 167. Can herring live and increase in inclosed waters, p 333
  • 168. Fish in the National Park and tributaries of Snake River -- propagation of whitefish, p 335
  • 169. Notes on the shad season of 1884, with references to other species, p 337
  • 170. Memoranda on landlocked salmon, p 341
  • 171. Note on the regeneration of the scales of the German carp, p 345
  • 172. The sturgeon fishery, p 346
  • 173. The cultivation of the sea, p 348
  • 174. The fish of Devil's Lake, Dakota, p 351
  • 175. Notes on the fish and fisheries of Japan, p 352
  • 176. Destruction of fish caused by nets of small mesh in Lake Michigan, p 353
  • 177. Notes upon oyster experiments in 1883, p 354
  • 178. The oyster as a popular article of food in North America, p 356
  • 179. Brief notes upon fish and fisheries, p 359
  • 180. Effect of cold on fishes, p 369
  • 181. The Scotch cod and ling fisheries, p 371
  • 182. On apparatus for collecting oyster spat, p 373
  • 183. Trapping kingfishers, rodents, and other enemies of trout, p 375
  • 184. Experiments in penning sea-fish, p 377
  • 185. Method of catching carp with a hook, p 380
  • 186. Care of goldfish -- Queries of William Rosenstihl, Jr., with replies, p 381
  • 187. Exports of fish-oil from Norway, 1878-'82, p 382
  • 188. Ten questions concerning the habits and breeding of landlocked salmon, with replies, p 383
  • 189. Report on black bass sent from America to Germany in 1883, p 384
  • 190. Arrangement with the Life-Saving Service and the Light-House Board for collecting whales, porpoises, sharks, and strange forms of marine life, p 385
  • 191. Use of light in sea-fishing, p 387
  • 192. The mode of life of eels, p 389
  • 193. The weight of fish in different conditions, p 391
  • 194. The world's market for klip-fish, roe, and herring, p 392
  • 195. On the conditions under which trout exist in the German waters, p 393
  • 196. Martin Brandt's method of preserving fresh fish and other articles of food, p 395
  • 197. A list of the blank forms, circulars, and minor publications of the United States Fish Commission, from August 1, 1883, to August 1, 1884, p 397
  • 198. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 401
  • 199. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 410
  • 200. Sanitary report on Old Providence Island, United States of Colombia, p 412
  • 201. Treatment of the Casella-Miller thermometer, p 415
  • 202. Hatching blackfish and Spanish mackerel, p 415
  • 203. The sea-fisheries of France and Algiers, p 417
  • 204. Discussion at the Dresden Conference in 1883, of the kinds of fish eggs to be obtained from the United States, p 419
  • 205. Notes on the decrease of lobsters, p 421
  • 206. Rearing carp in alkaline water, p 426
  • 207. On the scarcity of mackerel in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, p 427
  • 208. Notes on the Scotch herring fisheries, p 431
  • 209. Porpoise-fishing at Cape May, New Jersey, p 431
  • 210. Note upon the effect of high pressures on the vitality of minute fresh-water and salt-water organisms, p 433
  • 211. On the scarcity of mackerel in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, p 435
  • 212. Two hundred tons of dead fish, mostly perch, at Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, p 439
  • 213. Destruction of fish-food by bladderwort (Utricularia), p 443
  • 214. Notes on the fisheries of Gloucester, Mass., p 444
  • 215. Trapping gaspereau in Tangipahoa River, p 448
  • 216. On manufactured food for trout and carp, p 449
  • 217. On manufactured food for trout and carp, p 453
  • 218. Brief notes upon fish and fisheries, p 456
  • 219. The Canadian fisheries, p 457
  • 220. On the abundance of halibut near Iceland, p 463
  • 221. Artificial sea water for aquaria, p 465
  • 222. The oyster industry of the world, p 468
  • 223. Brief notes upon fish and the fisheries, p 469
  • Index, p. 471
Color
multicolored
Control code
NB00000066076
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unknown
Extent
500 p.
Form of item
electronic
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Access restricted to subscribing institutions
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illustrations, tables
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
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remote
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(Readex)10E60465612F54B0
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