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The Resource The eternal decline and fall of Rome : the history of a dangerous idea, Edward J. Watts

The eternal decline and fall of Rome : the history of a dangerous idea, Edward J. Watts

Label
The eternal decline and fall of Rome : the history of a dangerous idea
Title
The eternal decline and fall of Rome
Title remainder
the history of a dangerous idea
Statement of responsibility
Edward J. Watts
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
For more than 2000 years, those wishing to rule Rome and leaders inspired by their example have claimed they, and only they, could restore their society's past glory and make it great again. They left millions of victims in their wake. The decline of Rome has been a constant source of discussion for more than 2200 years. Everyone from American journalists in the twenty-first century AD to Roman politicians at the turn of the third century BC have used it as a tool to illustrate the negative consequences of changes in their world. Because Roman history is so long, it provides a buffet of ready-made stories of decline that can help develop the context around any snapshot. And Rome did, in fact, decline and, eventually, fall. An empire that once controlled all or part of more than 40 modern European, Asian, and African countries no longer exists. Roman prophets of decline were, ultimately, proven correct-a fact that makes their modern invocations all the more powerful. If it happened then, it could happen now. The Eternal Decline and Fall of Rome tells the stories of the people who built their political and literary careers around promises of Roman renewal as well as those of the victims they blamed for causing Rome's decline. Each chapter offers the historical context necessary to understand a moment or a series of moments in which Romans, aspiring Romans, and non--Romans used ideas of Roman decline and restoration to seize power and remake the world around them. The story begins during the Roman Republic just after 200 BC. It proceeds through the empire of Augustus and his successors, traces the Roman loss of much of western Europe in the fifth century AD, and then follows Roman history as it runs through the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantium) until its fall in 1453. The final two chapters look at ideas of Roman decline and renewal from the fifteenth century until today. If Rome illustrates the profound danger of the rhetoric of decline, it also demonstrates the rehabilitative potential of a rhetoric that focuses on collaborative restoration, a lesson of great relevance to our world today
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1975-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Watts, Edward Jay
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rome
  • Rome
  • HISTORY / Europe / Italy
  • Historiography
  • Rome (Empire)
Label
The eternal decline and fall of Rome : the history of a dangerous idea, Edward J. Watts
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: A snapshot and a story -- Decline in the Roman Republic -- The republic of violence and the empire of peace -- Manufacturing the Golden Age of Trajan -- Renewal without decline : the Antonines and Severans -- Decline and false renewal : the third century crisis -- Decline, renewal, and the invention of Christian progress -- Roman renewal versus Christian progress -- When renewal fails to arrive -- The loss of the Roman West and the Christian future -- Justinian, Roman progress, and the death of the Western Roman Empire -- Rome, the Arabs, and iconoclasm -- Old Rome, new Rome, and future Rome -- The retrenchment of one Roman Empire, the resurgence of another -- The captures of Constantinople -- The fall of Roman Constantinople and the end of Roman renewal -- Roman renewal after the fall -- The dangerous idea -- Conclusion: Roman decline and fall in contemporary America
Control code
1178641721
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xi, 301 pages
Isbn
9780190076719
Lccn
2021009498
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)1178641721
Label
The eternal decline and fall of Rome : the history of a dangerous idea, Edward J. Watts
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction: A snapshot and a story -- Decline in the Roman Republic -- The republic of violence and the empire of peace -- Manufacturing the Golden Age of Trajan -- Renewal without decline : the Antonines and Severans -- Decline and false renewal : the third century crisis -- Decline, renewal, and the invention of Christian progress -- Roman renewal versus Christian progress -- When renewal fails to arrive -- The loss of the Roman West and the Christian future -- Justinian, Roman progress, and the death of the Western Roman Empire -- Rome, the Arabs, and iconoclasm -- Old Rome, new Rome, and future Rome -- The retrenchment of one Roman Empire, the resurgence of another -- The captures of Constantinople -- The fall of Roman Constantinople and the end of Roman renewal -- Roman renewal after the fall -- The dangerous idea -- Conclusion: Roman decline and fall in contemporary America
Control code
1178641721
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xi, 301 pages
Isbn
9780190076719
Lccn
2021009498
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)1178641721

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