Context

Context of The modern dictionary of arts and sciences : or, complete system of literature. In which will be introduced every modern Improvement that has been made therein by the Learned and Ingenious of this or any other Nation; more particularly those valuable Discoveries that have been communicated by several Members of the Royal Society, the Royal Academy, and the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. Among the various other Branches of Learning, the following will be particularly and copiously explained, viz. Agriculture, Anatomy, Architecture, Arithmetic, Astronomy, Book-Keeping, Biography, Botany, Catoptrics, Chemistry, Chronology, Commerce, Cosmography. Dialling, Dioptrics, Ethics, Gardening, Gauging, Geography, Geometry, Grammar, Gunnery, Heraldry, History, Horsemanship, Husbandry, Hydraulics. Hydrography, Hydrostatics, Law, Logic, Maritime Affairs, Military Affairs, Mathematics, Mechanics, Merchandize, Metaphysics, Meteorology, Music, Navigation, Optics, Painting. Perspective, Philosophy, Physic, Pneumatics, Rhetoric, Sculpture, Statics. Surgery, Surveying. Theology, &c. &c. The whole greatly improved and modernized from every dictionary that hath preceded it, and ornamented with upwards of Two Hundred Figures, necessary to illustrate and embellish the Work. The historical, theological, philosophical, biographical, and grammatical parts, by the Rev. Percival Proctor, M.A. The astronomical, mechanical, and every other Branch of the Mathematics, by William Castieau, Teacher of the Mathematics, and Master of the Academy, opposite Berner's-Street, in Oxford-Street. The other articles by gentlemen particularly conversant in the respective subjects they have undertaken to explain

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